Author: Nancy W. Boyer

Death and Life

Stop Whining..It could be worse.

women in old shelter

You may decide that you have heard enough…horrors of war with decapitations; politics with vulgarities; fleeing people from disasters; secession of countries from the all-world scene and the fact that nothing seems right with the world.

It’s time to take a check of all that has gone before, for history is perhaps the best teacher of attitudes.  Many generations are now alive because someone in a concentration camp was determined to live.  The Civil War in the U.S.A. was one of the bloodiest with  brothers fighting against brothers.Our women today are not working in sweat shops to keep a war effort going, as did my Mother’s generation during World War II.

“Roughly 1,264,000 American soldiers have died in the nation’s wars–620,000 in the Civil War and 644,000 in all other conflicts. It was only as recently as the Vietnam War that the amount of American deaths in foreign wars eclipsed the number who died in the Civil War.”  (Civil War Trust)

civil war American Flag best

Many college students today cannot give simple facts about history…including the suffering or life style of those going through the Great Depression or during the Great Dust Bowl.  Here are a few pictures that can tell them a story or two.  Perhaps they may stop whining about college tuition or having the latest cars or cell phones if they take this part of history seriously. Even older people can review our history and what our forefathers and mothers endured.

Even some of the sayings that we take for granted have a historical meaning.  A friend of ours sent us a few worth noting.  I’m certain that we or the “millennials”of today would not want to live this way.

“Dirt Poor” …when dust and dirt covered everything during the Dust Bowl. Old house in dirt

 

“Piss Poor” because there were no bathrooms and used a pot instead if they could afford a pot.  Some will remember these days of using a pot. Living in a hut

 

No deodorant. Baths once a week, if then,  in a common tub. The babies were last and may be the start of the saying ‘Don’t throw the baby out with the bath water!’

Why do you think a bride carried a flower bouquet in the favorite month of June when flowers were blooming?   The smell of the flowers might hide the body odor.Depression Family

 

 

“Upper Crust”  Bread was so hard to get that families had to divide whatever they had. Workers got the burnt bottom part; the rest of the family got the middle and only the guests got the top “upper crust” which was the best.  Try making any child or young person today wait without whining for what is left over…especially because guests are to be treated with total respect.

women in old shelter

Living where one can…the Great Depression

Taking care of our world and each other, while appreciating what we have been so richly blessed with, is a top priority for this generation and the next.  The next time you look at a beautiful green tree, think of the Dust Bowl.  The next time you want to lash out from some injustice, think of this command.  “… Fix your thoughts on what is true, and honorable, and right, and pure, and lovely, and admirable. Think about things that are excellent and worthy of praise.”  Philippians 4:8

It may be a difficult thing to do, for we are used to getting what we want when we want it. Try disciplining yourself to not allowing a whine to come out of your mouth for just a week.  This challenge is for me also. After the week, see if it has made a difference in your life.   Let me know if you can do it.   (Boyer Writes  at boyerwrites@yahoo.com)

Click for  VIDEO explaining the Dust Bowl of 1930’s.

Credits: Video History in the Headlines

 

 

 


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